Discovery of an old photograph:

“An apparent modern pterosaur in a 19th Century Photograph” Salt Lake City-Murray, UT (sfrfg press release) June 3, 2017 A forensic videographer has announced his discovery of an old source for the photograph that is labeled “Ptp.” On June 2, 2017, Jonathan Whitcomb, of Murray, Utah, found that the photo was published by Underwood & Underwood, which was a leading company in photography from the late 19th century until at least the 1920’s. Before the year 2017, many cryptozoologists had assumed that the photo (which shows what looks like a recently deceased pterosaur or “pterodactyl”) was a hoax, maybe created with modern digital image-manipulation software like Photoshop. One of the world’s best known cryptozoologists, Loren Coleman, gave that opinion of the photo in a blog post on February 16, 2007: “Verdict: photoshopping.” Whitcomb now says, “The Photoshop conjecture is now completely untenable,” and he explains, “Underwood & Underwood discontinued their earlier type of photograph publishing in 1920, and it was in that early line of business that Ptp would very likely have been distributed, not in the kind of publishing they did after 1920. In addition, the company ceased business activities in the 1940’s, and Photoshop did not exist until decades later, after modern computers became commonplace.” Whitcomb had been working with Clifford Paiva, a physicist living in California, from January through late May, of 2017, as they analyzed the photograph itself. Paiva found, early in the year, what looked like a small tree branch under the beak of the apparent pterosaur. It strongly suggested to the two scientists that the photo was taken before about the year 1870. Before about that time in the history of photography, many seconds were usually needed to record an image, so persons needed to be kept motionless, often through the use of stabilizing props. Related to that, Whitcomb says, “The shadow under the shoe of the man in the front indicates that only the left side of the sole of the shoe was contacting the beak of the animal. This is consistent with the concept that the man was trying to keep his foot perfectly still during many seconds of a photographic recording. This fits perfectly with Paiva’s finding of an apparent stabilizing prop under the beak. If he had been putting much weight on the beak, it could have slipped, causing movement during the recording, even with a prop under the beak. That shadow demonstrates the care the man was taking to keep still. This is consistent with a pre-1870 practice.” Whitcomb acknowledges the possibility that a 19th century model construction could account for the apparent pterosaur, but he says, “Why would a group of men go to so much trouble to make such a complicated large model? And how would they know enough about pterosaur anatomy to understand the wing-folding that takes place when some of those flying creatures were walking or sitting on the ground? And why does the lighter colored areas of the wings show, under magnification, structures that appear to be biological, yet differing from what would be expected in model-building materials available in the 19th century? And how did those men know so much about Pteranodon anatomy to construct such a realistic head? And how did they construct that head, with the building materials available?” Whitcomb attributes the delay in the scientific discoveries to several factors, including the popularity of two kinds of hoax practices in the Victorian era of photography: decapitated-heads tricks and ghost imitations. Those kinds of hoaxes made it easy for many people to dismiss the Ptp photograph as just another strange hoax. According to Whitcomb, “The only scientist to look deeply into Ptp in recent years, before 2017, was Paiva, and his discoveries received almost no publicity until I began examining the photo in greater depth than I had ever done before, early in 2017. That is when I began publishing our findings.” ###
News Releases
Photo of an apparent Pterosaur
Jonathan Whitcomb, a forensic videographer
Contact Information
Jonathan David Whitcomb 5347 South New Hampton Dr Murray, Utah 84123 801-590-9692               About Whitcomb Contact online             Whitcomb’s blog Video on modern pterosaurs    Press room Nonfiction book: Modern Pterosaurs
An old photograph rediscovered
The physicist Clifford Paiva discovered an apparent stabilizing prop under the beak of the animal. This suggested the photo was taken before about the year 1870.
Nonfiction book Modern Pterosaurs
Copyright 2017 Jonathan David Whitcomb
The photograph “Ptp” has now been confirmed old
Left-side border of the photograph: “Underwood & Underwood”
Press Release Contact Information
Jonathan David Whitcomb 5347 South New Hampton Dr Murray, Utah 84123 801-590-9692               About Whitcomb Contact online             Whitcomb’s blog Video on modern pterosaurs    Press room Nonfiction book: Modern Pterosaurs
“Trust one eyewitness of a plane crash over the imaginations of a hundred professors who’ve agreed how that kind of plane should fly.” Jonathan Whitcomb

Discovery of an old photograph:

“An apparent modern pterosaur in a 19th Century Photograph” Salt Lake City-Murray, UT (sfrfg press release) June 3, 2017 A forensic videographer has announced his discovery of an old source for the photograph that is labeled “Ptp.” On June 2, 2017, Jonathan Whitcomb, of Murray, Utah, found that the photo was published by Underwood & Underwood, which was a leading company in photography from the late 19th century until at least the 1920’s. Before the year 2017, many cryptozoologists had assumed that the photo (which shows what looks like a recently deceased pterosaur or “pterodactyl”) was a hoax, maybe created with modern digital image-manipulation software like Photoshop. One of the world’s best known cryptozoologists, Loren Coleman, gave that opinion of the photo in a blog post on February 16, 2007: “Verdict: photoshopping.” Whitcomb now says, “The Photoshop conjecture is now completely untenable,” and he explains, “Underwood & Underwood discontinued their earlier type of photograph publishing in 1920, and it was in that early line of business that Ptp would very likely have been distributed, not in the kind of publishing they did after 1920. In addition, the company ceased business activities in the 1940’s, and Photoshop did not exist until decades later, after modern computers became commonplace.” Whitcomb had been working with Clifford Paiva, a physicist living in California, from January through late May, of 2017, as they analyzed the photograph itself. Paiva found, early in the year, what looked like a small tree branch under the beak of the apparent pterosaur. It strongly suggested to the two scientists that the photo was taken before about the year 1870. Before about that time in the history of photography, many seconds were usually needed to record an image, so persons needed to be kept motionless, often through the use of stabilizing props. Related to that, Whitcomb says, “The shadow under the shoe of the man in the front indicates that only the left side of the sole of the shoe was contacting the beak of the animal. This is consistent with the concept that the man was trying to keep his foot perfectly still during many seconds of a photographic recording. This fits perfectly with Paiva’s finding of an apparent stabilizing prop under the beak. If he had been putting much weight on the beak, it could have slipped, causing movement during the recording, even with a prop under the beak. That shadow demonstrates the care the man was taking to keep still. This is consistent with a pre-1870 practice.” Whitcomb acknowledges the possibility that a 19th century model construction could account for the apparent pterosaur, but he says, “Why would a group of men go to so much trouble to make such a complicated large model? And how would they know enough about pterosaur anatomy to understand the wing-folding that takes place when some of those flying creatures were walking or sitting on the ground? And why does the lighter colored areas of the wings show, under magnification, structures that appear to be biological, yet differing from what would be expected in model-building materials available in the 19th century? And how did those men know so much about Pteranodon anatomy to construct such a realistic head? And how did they construct that head, with the building materials available?” Whitcomb attributes the delay in the scientific discoveries to several factors, including the popularity of two kinds of hoax practices in the Victorian era of photography: decapitated-heads tricks and ghost imitations. Those kinds of hoaxes made it easy for many people to dismiss the Ptp photograph as just another strange hoax. According to Whitcomb, “The only scientist to look deeply into Ptp in recent years, before 2017, was Paiva, and his discoveries received almost no publicity until I began examining the photo in greater depth than I had ever done before, early in 2017. That is when I began publishing our findings.” ###
News Releases
Copyright 2017 Jonathan David Whitcomb
Photo of an apparent Pterosaur
Jonathan Whitcomb, a forensic videographer
The photograph “Ptp” has now been confirmed old
Contact Information
Jonathan David Whitcomb 5347 South New Hampton Dr Murray, Utah 84123 801-590-9692               About Whitcomb Contact online             Whitcomb’s blog Video on modern pterosaurs    Press room Nonfiction book: Modern Pterosaurs
Press Release Contact Information
Jonathan David Whitcomb 5347 South New Hampton Dr Murray, Utah 84123 801-590-9692               About Whitcomb Contact online             Whitcomb’s blog Video on modern pterosaurs    Press room Nonfiction book: Modern Pterosaurs
An old photograph rediscovered
The physicist Clifford Paiva discovered an apparent stabilizing prop under the beak of the animal. This suggested the photo was taken before about the year 1870.
Nonfiction book Modern Pterosaurs
Left-side border of the photograph: “Underwood & Underwood”
“Trust one eyewitness of a plane crash over the imaginations of a hundred professors who’ve agreed how that kind of plane should fly.” Jonathan Whitcomb

Discovery of an old

photograph:

“An apparent modern pterosaur in a 19th Century Photograph” Salt Lake City-Murray, UT (sfrfg press release) June 3, 2017 A forensic videographer has announced his discovery of an old source for the photograph that is labeled “Ptp.” On June 2, 2017, Jonathan Whitcomb, of Murray, Utah, found that the photo was published by Underwood & Underwood, which was a leading company in photography from the late 19th century until at least the 1920’s. Before the year 2017, many cryptozoologists had assumed that the photo (which shows what looks like a recently deceased pterosaur or “pterodactyl”) was a hoax, maybe created with modern digital image-manipulation software like Photoshop. One of the world’s best known cryptozoologists, Loren Coleman, gave that opinion of the photo in a blog post on February 16, 2007: “Verdict: photoshopping.” Whitcomb now says, “The Photoshop conjecture is now completely untenable,” and he explains, “Underwood & Underwood discontinued their earlier type of photograph publishing in 1920, and it was in that early line of business that Ptp would very likely have been distributed, not in the kind of publishing they did after 1920. In addition, the company ceased business activities in the 1940’s, and Photoshop did not exist until decades later, after modern computers became commonplace.” Whitcomb had been working with Clifford Paiva, a physicist living in California, from January through late May, of 2017, as they analyzed the photograph itself. Paiva found, early in the year, what looked like a small tree branch under the beak of the apparent pterosaur. It strongly suggested to the two scientists that the photo was taken before about the year 1870. Before about that time in the history of photography, many seconds were usually needed to record an image, so persons needed to be kept motionless, often through the use of stabilizing props. Related to that, Whitcomb says, “The shadow under the shoe of the man in the front indicates that only the left side of the sole of the shoe was contacting the beak of the animal. This is consistent with the concept that the man was trying to keep his foot perfectly still during many seconds of a photographic recording. This fits perfectly with Paiva’s finding of an apparent stabilizing prop under the beak. If he had been putting much weight on the beak, it could have slipped, causing movement during the recording, even with a prop under the beak. That shadow demonstrates the care the man was taking to keep still. This is consistent with a pre- 1870 practice.” Whitcomb acknowledges the possibility that a 19th century model construction could account for the apparent pterosaur, but he says, “Why would a group of men go to so much trouble to make such a complicated large model? And how would they know enough about pterosaur anatomy to understand the wing-folding that takes place when some of those flying creatures were walking or sitting on the ground? And why does the lighter colored areas of the wings show, under magnification, structures that appear to be biological, yet differing from what would be expected in model-building materials available in the 19th century? And how did those men know so much about Pteranodon anatomy to construct such a realistic head? And how did they construct that head, with the building materials available?” Whitcomb attributes the delay in the scientific discoveries to several factors, including the popularity of two kinds of hoax practices in the Victorian era of photography: decapitated-heads tricks and ghost imitations. Those kinds of hoaxes made it easy for many people to dismiss the Ptp photograph as just another strange hoax. According to Whitcomb, “The only scientist to look deeply into Ptp in recent years, before 2017, was Paiva, and his discoveries received almost no publicity until I began examining the photo in greater depth than I had ever done before, early in 2017. That is when I began publishing our findings.” ###
News Releases
Copyright 2017 Jonathan David Whitcomb
Photo of an apparent Pterosaur
Jonathan Whitcomb, a forensic videographer
The photograph “Ptp” has now been confirmed old
Contact Information
Jonathan David Whitcomb 5347 South New Hampton Dr Murray, Utah 84123 801-590-9692               About Whitcomb Contact online             Whitcomb’s blog Video on modern pterosaurs    Press room Nonfiction book: Modern Pterosaurs
Press Release Contact Information
Jonathan David Whitcomb 5347 South New Hampton Dr Murray, Utah 84123 801-590-9692               About Whitcomb Contact online             Whitcomb’s blog Video on modern pterosaurs    Press room Nonfiction book: Modern Pterosaurs
An old photograph rediscovered
The physicist Clifford Paiva discovered an apparent stabilizing prop under the beak of the animal. This suggested the photo was taken before about the year 1870.
Nonfiction book Modern Pterosaurs
Left-side border of the photograph: “Underwood & Underwood”
“Trust one eyewitness of a plane crash over the imaginations of a hundred professors who’ve agreed how that kind of plane should fly.” Jonathan Whitcomb